Sunset At Malarkey's On The Bay

When we know not other place to put someting

It's Happy Hour 1/11/2016 At Malarkeys And We Got A Show

Did You Know? - Sunset or sundown, is the daily disappearance of the Sun below the western horizon as a result of Earth's rotation.

The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the trailing edge of the Sun's disk disappears below the horizon. Near to the horizon, atmospheric refraction causes the ray path of light from the Sun to be distorted to such an extent that the Sun's disk is already about one diameter below the horizon when sunset is observed.

Sunset is distinct from dusk, which is the time at which the sky becomes completely dark, which occurs when the Sun is approximately eighteen degrees below the horizon. The period between sunset and dusk is called twilight.

Locations north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle experience no sunset or sunrise at least one day of the year, when the polar day or the polar night persists continuously for 24 hours.

Sunset creates unique atmospheric conditions such as the often intense orange and red colors of the Sun and the surrounding sky.

Sunset at Malarkey's

Sunset at Malarkey's
It started out kind of grey

Quotation To Remember: "Sunsets, like childhood, are viewed with wonder not just because they are beautiful but because they are fleeting."

Sunset at Malarkey's
Then it got a bit lighter

Sunset at Malarkey's
The blues started to show

Quotation To Remember: "Eternity to the godly is a day that has no sunset; eternity to the wicked is a night that has no sunrise."

Sunset at Malarkey's
As trhe sun actually set the oranges began

Sunset at Malarkey's
Many colors

Did You Know? - Sunset is the point at which the Sun is first completely below the horizon marking the start of twilight. It should not be confused with dusk, which occurs at the end of twilight.

Sunset at Malarkey's
All of a sudden... Wow

Sunset at Malarkey's
Looks like an A-Bomb

Did You Know? - As a ray of white sunlight travels through the atmosphere to an observer, some of the colors are scattered out of the beam by air molecules and airborne particles, changing the final color of the beam the viewer sees. Because the shorter wavelength components, such as blue and green, scatter more strongly, these colors are preferentially removed from the beam.

Sunset at Malarkey's
Looks like the ocean is on fire

Sunset at Malarkey's
Beautiful!

Did You Know? - In some languages, points of the compass bear names etymologically derived from words for sunrise and sunset. The English words "orient" and "occident", meaning "east" and "west", respectively, are descended from Latin words meaning "sunrise" and "sunset".

Sunset at Malarkey's
It keeps getting better

Sunset at Malarkey's
Dusk is the period of time at the end of evening twilight.

Sunset at Malarkey's
It's now twilight

Sunset at Malarkey's
Pinks and blues make for a stunning view

Sunset at Malarkey's
Can't keep our eyes off the sky

Sunset at Malarkey's
Civil, nautical, and astronomical twilight.

Did You Know? - The time of dusk can be thought of relative to the time of twilight, which has several alternative technical definitions:

Dusk as the last part of civil twilight ends when the sun is 6 degrees below the horizon in the evening. At this time objects are distinguishable and some stars and planets are visible to the naked eye.

Dusk as the last part of nautical twilight ends when the sun is 12 degrees below the horizon in the evening. At this time, objects are no longer distinguishable, and the horizon is no longer visible to the naked eye.

Dusk as the last part of astronomical twilight ends when the sun is 18 degrees below the horizon in the evening. At this time the sun no longer illuminates the sky, and thus no longer interferes with astronomical observations.

Sunset at Malarkey's
Just WOW!

Sunset at Malarkey's
Amzing amount of pink

Sunset at Malarkey's
Brilliant colors

Sunset at Malarkey's
Oops!


Sunset at Malarkey's
We kept starring at the sky!

Sunset at Malarkey's
All of a sudden we got oranges

Sunset at Malarkey's
...and then back to pinks

Sunset at Malarkey's

Red Sails In The Sunset