The Art Deco Ball Afternoon Tea Dance

An Amazing Yearly Event

It's Time For Tea (Tea For 2+2+2+2+2+2=12)

Page 1 - Saturday Evening Art Deco Ball | Page 2 - Sunday Afternoon Tea Dance | Page 3 - Sir Winston's


Click the collage for the 1600 pixel image

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
In The OB (Not OC)... Observation Bar

Did You Know? - The earliest definition of cocktail was in the May 13, 1806, edition of The Balance and Columbian Repository, a publication in Hudson, New York, in which an answer was provided to the question, "What is a cocktail?". It replied:

Cocktail is a stimulating liquor composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters—it is vulgarly called a bittered sling and is supposed to be an excellent electioneering potion, inasmuch as it renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time that it fuddles the head. It is said, also to be of great use to a Democratic candidate: because a person, having swallowed a glass of it, is ready to swallow the truth.

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
You meet the nicest people in line... Vicky, Gigi, Larry, and Del are holding our place

Let The Tea Dance Begin

Did You Know? - A tea dance, or thé dansant (French: literally dancing tea) is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, (London, n.d. [1880]) included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings.

By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc."[3] Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore.

The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. [5] Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
We brought a friend and we are going to teach them how to dance..... Ah, Fred and Ginger

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Del look unhappy... He has no food... yet!

:"Tea
Getting food for Del will b e easier than this...

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
John Thomas... The Art Deco Society President and our hero!

:"Tea
There is a aura around him... Or it is the pastels

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
See... Del is happier now!

:"Tea
Remember Del, we are ALL watching you

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
"Where are the martini's???"

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Del not grumpy anymore or we will take his color away

:"Tea
Now see... desert does not look so good in sepia tones

:"Tea

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
The bodies are still but the feets, they be moving

:"Tea
When I look into her eyes the rest of the world goes black and white

:"Tea
We will take a dozen

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Gigi and Larry

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
1930's fashions all around

:"Tea
When dresses were dresses....

The Ian Whitcom Ragtime Band Was Amazing This Afternoon

Did You Know? - Ragtime originated in African American music in the late 19th century, descending from the jigs and march music played by black bands. By the start of the 20th century it became widely popular throughout North America and was listened and danced to, performed, and written by people of many different subcultures.

A distinctly American musical style, ragtime may be considered a synthesis of African syncopation and European classical music, especially the marches made popular by John Philip Sousa.Ragtime (alternatively spelled rag-time) is an original musical genre which enjoyed its peak popularity between 1897 and 1918. Its main characteristic trait is its syncopated, or "ragged," rhythm. It began as dance music in the red-light districts of American cities such as St. Louis and New Orleans years before being published as popular sheet music for piano. It was a modification of the march made popular by John Philip Sousa, with additional polyrhythms coming from African music.

The ragtime composer Scott Joplin became famous through the publication in 1899 of the "Maple Leaf Rag" and a string of ragtime hits that followed, although he was later forgotten by all but a small, dedicated community of ragtime aficionados until the major ragtime revival in the early 1970s. For at least 12 years after its publication, the "Maple Leaf Rag" heavily influenced subsequent ragtime composers with its melody lines, harmonic progressions or metric patterns.

Ragtime fell out of favor as jazz claimed the public's imagination after 1917, but there have been numerous revivals since the music has been re-discovered. First in the early 1940s many jazz bands began to include ragtime in their repertoire and put out ragtime recordings on 78 rpm records. A more significant revival occurred in the 1950s as a wider variety of ragtime styles of the past were made available on records, and new rags were composed, published, and recorded. In 1971 Joshua Rifkin brought out a compilation of Scott Joplin's work which was nominated for a Grammy Award, and in 1973, the motion picture The Sting brought ragtime to a wide audience with its soundtrack of Joplin tunes.

ragtime

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Great music for the tea dance


Practice makes perfect

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Were movin'

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Follow the leader...

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
The floor is so polished it looks like a mirror

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Cutting loose


They still look good even in black & white

:"Tea
Need a pair???

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
John is always working

The Floor Is Full... But Most Everyone Knows Line Of Dance

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Do you see Vince & Nancy? Ed & Kathy?

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Ah.... Paul's favorite spot... The 'ol watering hole

:"Tea

Definition: Watering hole

n. In both senses also called water hole.
1. A small natural depression in which water collects, especially a pool where animals come to drink.
2. Informal A social gathering place, such as a bar or saloon, where drinks are served:

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
The band speeds up... The dancers speed up

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Watching the action go on can make you tired

:"Tea :"Tea :"Tea

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
John explains to Linda, Larry, and Gigi how to dance without getting tired

Nancy Is In Style

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Nancy is right in style with her art deco gown ... Like stepping out of a history book

:"Tea
From July 1923.....

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
De;s suspenders add a dash of... ah... well... ah....

:"Tea

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Nancy & Vince float across the floor

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Kathy and Ed are right in style

:"Tea
OMG... Check the prices.....

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Looking good

:"Tea
We gave Ed a pile of order blanks.... $1.98 ?????

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Larry & Gigi are getting ready to hot the floor again

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Visiting with new friends.... Life is indeed good

:"Tea

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
"Hey Larry... Speed it up we may ge a ticket for going to slow!"

:"Tea

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Del practises mind control over Vicky....

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Time to rest

:"Tea
Nancy's softer side

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Looking for the last song of the afternoon

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Now you see them....

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Now you don't....

Art Deco Sunday Tea Dance 2011
Goodbye until next year....

Did You Know? - The unicorn is a legendary animal commonly portrayed as a white horse with a goat's beard and a large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead. First mentioned by the ancient Greeks, it became the most important imaginary animal of the middle ages and Renaissance when it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature, a symbol of purity and grace, which could only be captured by a virgin. In the encyclopedias its horn was said to have the power to render poisoned water potable and to heal sickness. Until the 19th century, belief in unicorns was widespread among historians, alchemists, writers, poets, naturalists, physicians, and theologians.

:"Tea

It's time for Sir Winston's Lounge

Page 1 - Saturday Evening Art Deco Ball | Page 2 - Sunday Afternoon Tea Dance | Page 3 - Sir Winston's