The Huntington Library April 8th 2013

Visiting The Huntington Library Is Always a Treat

What A Beautiful Day (Page Two)

Page 1 - Arrival And Strolling | Page 2 - The Chinese Gardens
Page 3 - The Japanese Gardens | Page 4 - Tea And Going Home

  

At the Huntington April 2013
An amazingly peaceful place


Aerial view of the garden does NOT reveal its beauty

At the Huntington April 2013
Just west of the Conservatory is the back entrance to the Chinese Gardens

At the Huntington April 2013
Rub his tongue for luck before entering the garden

At the Huntington April 2013
The Hawthorns were magnificent

At the Huntington April 2013
Walk through the path reveals cherry trees getting ready to provide fruit

At the Huntington April 2013
The green snowball plant

Quotation - Gardening requires lots of water - most of it in the form of perspiration.  ~Lou Erickson

At the Huntington April 2013
We mean green!

At the Huntington April 2013
Cherries getting ready to turn red

Did You Know? - The cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy drupe (stone fruit). The cherry fruits of commerce are usually obtained from a limited number of species, including especially cultivars of the sweet cherry, Prunus avium.

The name 'cherry' also refers to the cherry tree, and is sometimes applied to almonds and visually similar flowering trees in the genus Prunus, as in "ornamental cherry", "cherry blossom", etc. Wild cherry may refer to any of the cherry species growing outside of cultivation, although Prunus avium is often referred to specifically by the name "wild cherry" in the British Isles.

At the Huntington April 2013
Green today....

Did You Know? - The native range of the sweet cherry extends through most of Europe, western Asia and parts of northern Africa, and the fruit has been consumed throughout its range since prehistoric times. A cultivated cherry is recorded as having been brought to Rome by Lucius Licinius Lucullus from northeastern Anatolia, modern day Turkey, also known as the Pontus region, in 72 BC

At the Huntington April 2013
Red in the next month...

At the Huntington April 2013
Sue and Greg discuss the flora....

At the Huntington April 2013
The flowering cherries are still blooming...

At the Huntington April 2013
Greg had to reexamine the green snowball tree

At the Huntington April 2013
Snap... Another piece of art is created

Quotation To Remember: There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.  ~Mirabel Osler

At the Huntington April 2013
Why did the girls cross the bridge?
To get to the other side

At the Huntington April 2013
This is called strolling....

At the Huntington April 2013 At the Huntington April 2013

At the Huntington April 2013
The lake was quite clear today...

At the Huntington April 2013
Spring is here.... No doubt

At the Huntington April 2013

At the Huntington April 2013
Pictures for the family.... This is good

At the Huntington April 2013
Beauty everywhere

At the Huntington April 2013
Pink in a sea of green

At the Huntington April 2013
A moon bridge

Did You Know? - A moon bridge is a highly arched pedestrian bridge associated with gardens in China and Japan. The moon bridge originated in China and was later introduced to Japan.

This type of bridge was originally designed to allow pedestrians to cross canals while allowing the passage of barges beneath. When constructed using the climbing ascent and descent this had the further advantage of not using space from the adjoining fields for approaches.

In formal garden design a moon bridge is placed so that it is reflected in still water. The high arch and its reflection form a circle, symbolizing the moon.

At the Huntington April 2013
Nancy strolls through the grounds....

At the Huntington April 2013
The willows provide a frame for the lake

At the Huntington April 2013
Chinese maple trees are so bright

At the Huntington April 2013
The leaves take on many shapes depending on the variety

Quotation To Remember: Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets used to it.  ~Author Unknown

At the Huntington April 2013
Over the water to explore the other side

At the Huntington April 2013
Chinese Tea House

Did You Know? - Chinese tea culture refers to the methods of preparation of tea, the equipment used to make tea and the occasions in which tea is consumed in China. The terms chayi, 茶藝 ("Art of Tea") and "Tea Ceremony" have been used, but the term 茶文化 ("Tea Culture") includes more than just the ceremony. Also "culture" is easier to translate into English than the Chinese term 藝 ("art").

Tea culture in China differs from that of Europe, Britain or Japan in such things as preparation methods, tasting methods and the occasions for which it is consumed. Even now, in both casual and formal Chinese occasions, tea is consumed regularly. In addition to being a drink, Chinese tea is used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Chinese cuisine.

At the Huntington April 2013
Amazing pink colors

At the Huntington April 2013
A walk down the canyon to the Japanese Gardens is forthcoming

At the Huntington April 2013
Hearing the water flowing is so relaxing

At the Huntington April 2013
Time for hide and seek

At the Huntington April 2013

At the Huntington April 2013
Greg leads the way...

Quotation To Remember: The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses.  ~Hanna Rion

At the Huntington April 2013
A babbling brook... Makes one just want to stop and rest

At the Huntington April 2013
Nancy got lost and had to use the cellphone....
We were behind her watching her dial the phone

At the Huntington April 2013

  

Page 1 - Arrival And Strolling | Page 2 - The Chinese Gardens
Page 3 - The Japanese Gardens | Page 4 - Tea And Going Home