Birthday 2012... Time For Japanese & Rose Garden (Page Two)

She is Perfection!

We Continue Our Walk (Page Two)

Page 1 - Arrival and Wandering | Page 2 - The Japanese Gardens & Rose Garden
Page 3 - Tea & Museums

  

Japanese & Rose Gardens
A Buddest building was added to the Japanese Garden donated by locals

Japanese & Rose Gardens
New waterfalls behind gthe original buildings

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Greg catches a good shot

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Neat display

Did You Know? - The words "viewing stone" and "suiseki" are often used interchangeably in the Western world. However, they are not the same. The Japanese Art of Suiseki is much more refined and defined. In the study, collection, and appreciation of stones as art, we must understand that there is a clear distinction between the cultural forms of stone appreciation.

Japanese Suiseki criteria formed the basis for defining the characteristics of our Western stones. Likewise, Suiseki classification is also the international criteria for stone recognition and naming used throughout the world.

One of the key aspects of this art form is the suggestability of the stones. True suiseki should "suggest" something to the viewer, yet not be a precise miniature representation of the object. This suggestibility may come from a memory, a feeling, or recognition of a special place or mountain. It could be a waterfall, a house, an animal, or a person. Sometimes the special stone has a shape that represents nothing in particular, but the texture of the stone or its patina evokes special feelings, emotions, or recognitions.

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Greg sees something in it

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Yes... You are supposed to touch it

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Small maple trees will become bonsai

Japanese & Rose Gardens
An azalea

Did You Know? - Satsuki Azaleas are popular bonsai plants for many reasons. It can take a hard pruning, the flowers are amazing, and they can be developed fast. Since azaleas prefer to be slightly acidic, a popular soil to grow them in is kanuma.

Satsuki azaleas have a diversity of flower forms and color patterns with multiple patterns often appearing on a single plant. Satsuki bloom from May to June; the name “ Satsuki ” in Japanese is reference to their blooming period, the fifth month of the Asian lunar calendar .

Japanese & Rose Gardens

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Amazing patience to create such beauty

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Sometimes they paint on the bark to bring out the textures

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Right out in the open

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Zen Buddist walk through

Did You Know? - The Japanese rock garden (枯山水 karesansui?) or "dry landscape" garden, often called a zen garden, creates a miniature stylized landscape through carefully composed arrangements of rocks, water features, moss, pruned trees and bushes, and uses gravel or sand that is raked to represent ripples in water.

A zen garden is usually relatively small, surrounded by a wall, and is usually meant to be seen while seated from a single viewpoint outside the garden, such as the porch of the hojo, the residence of the chief monk of the temple or monastery.

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Capturing the beauty

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The docent leads the way

Japanese & Rose Gardens
No steps for us... We take the pathway around the steps

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Great garden.... Mostly green

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Very creative

Did You Know? - Rock gardens existed in Japan at least since the Heian Period (784-1185). These early gardens were described in the first manual of Japanese gardens, Sakuteiki, or Records of Garden Keeping, written at the end of the 11th century by Tachibana no Toshitsuna (1028–1094). They were largely copied from the Chinese gardens of the Song Dynasty (960-1279), where groups of rocks symbolized Mount Penglai, the legendary mountain-island home of the Eight Immortals in Chinese mythology, known in Japanese as Horai.

The Sakuteiki described exactly how rocks should be placed. In one passage, he wrote: "In a place where there is neither a lake or a stream, one can put in place what is called a kare-sansui, or dry landscape..." This kind of garden featured either rocks placed upright like mountains, or laid out in a miniature landscape of hills and ravines, with few plants.

He described several other styles of rock garden, which usually included a stream or pond, including the great river style, the mountain river style, and the marsh style. The ocean style featured rocks that appeared to have been eroded by waves, surrounded by a bank of white sand, like a beach.

Japanese & Rose Gardens
View from the path

Japanese & Rose Gardens
See the waterfall coming down the rocks... Very subtle

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Ed was quite knowledgible

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Sue explains how gravity works....

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Pondering the moment

Japanese & Rose Gardens
"Click"

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Miss Hollywood in disguise

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The house was refurbished....

Did You Know? - Traditional Japanese housing does not have a designated use for each room aside from the entrance area (genkan, 玄関), kitchen, bathroom, and toilet. Any room can be a living room, dining room, study, or bedroom. This is possible because all the necessary furniture is portable, being stored in oshiire, a small section of the house (large closets) used for storage. It is important to note that in Japan, living room is expressed as i-ma, living "space". This is because the size of a room can be changed by altering the partitioning. Large traditional houses often have only one ima (living room/space) under the roof, while kitchen, bathroom, and toilet are attached on the side of the house as extensions.

Somewhat similar to modern offices, partitions within the house are created by fusuma, sliding doors made from wood and paper, which are portable and easily removed. Fusuma seal each partition from top to bottom so it can create a mini room within the house. On the edge of a house are rōka, wooden floored passages, that are similar to hallways. Rōka and ima are partitioned by shōji, sliding and portable doors that are also made from paper and wood. Unlike fusuma, paper used for shōji is very thin so outside light can pass through into the house. This was before glass was used for sliding doors. Rōka and outside of the house are either partitioned by walls or portable wooden boards that are used to seal the house at night. Extended roofs protect the rōka from getting wet when it rains, except during typhoon season where the house gets sealed completely. Roofs of traditional houses in Japan are made of wood and clay, with tiles or thatched areas on top.

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The outbuilding

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The outside wall is within the box and folds out as needed....
When out, there is a walkway around the building

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Carri checks it out

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Great view from the house

Japanese & Rose Gardens
All new grass and many new plants... Chinese gardens are colorful.... Japanese gardens are green and contemplative

Japanese & Rose Gardens
See the outside walkway?

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Neat idea... It works

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The house can close up during the rainy season

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Amazing architecture

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Pods hang from the "patio"

Japanese & Rose Gardens

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Here we go... to the Rose Garden

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The uprights look new... They are!

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The shade drops the tempterature about ten degrees

The Restoration Is A Three Year Project

Japanese & Rose Gardens
What they looked like when the project started

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Take the damage down to the bare metal

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Apply the new concrete and use various tools to make the bark-like appearance

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Scafolds used to get to the top of the new work

Did You Know? - The Huntington is an invaluable resource and a place of beauty for all who visit. It's art collections, libraries, botanical gardens, and educational programs help uphold one of its biggest priorities: to preserve the past and protect the vision of founder Henry E. Huntington for generations to come. Craftsman Terence Eagan upholds these values with his "Faux Bois" work in the Huntington gardens. 

Faux Bois (meaning false wood in French) is an age-old art form that involves using various materials such as concrete, mortar, and grout to create a structure that looks deceptively similar to wood.

 For a year Mr. Eagan has been restoring the tree-like concrete that arches over the walkway in one of the Huntington gardens. Originally done in the 1920’s the concrete and the steel supporting it has slowly decayed and is in desperate need of repair and replacement. A unique aspect of this particular project is that we do not know the artist who first made these trees, leaving Terry with an interesting position in terms of artistic liberties throughout his restorative process.

Throughout his time at the Huntington, Terry has approached his work with both a scientific and artistic perspective where he had to use trial and error, developing unique tools to find the best end result. This website shows how he has come to what is now his "process" and what it entails. Read more...

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The work tent in the distance

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Still a work in progress

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Grown from a seed found in Mexico City 100 years ago....

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The herb garden

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Our flag and the tea room

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Now that is red

Japanese & Rose Gardens
The garden is in full bloom

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Magnificent colors

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Sue found a beauty

Japanese & Rose Gardens

Japanese & Rose Gardens

Japanese & Rose Gardens
Time for tea

  

Page 1 - Arrival and Wandering | Page 2 - The Japanese Gardens & Rose Garden
Page 3 - Tea & Museums