Disney's California Food & Wine Festival

“I eat merely to put food out of my mind.”

Visit #7 - Sweet Sunday With Sweet Cheeks!

Sweet Cheeks
M-M-M-M-M-M

Food and Wine visit seven
Our kind of bakers... wine everywhere!

It was a beautiful but chilly day! Off we go to the Sweet Sunday!

Food and Wine visit seven
Clink!  The champagne was great!

Did you know? - The champagne flûte (fr. Flûte à Champagne) is a stem glass with a tall, narrow bowl. The bowl of a flute may resemble a narrow wine glass as seen in the illustration; or a trumpet shape; or be very narrow and straight-sided.

As with other stemware, the stem allows the drinker to hold the glass without affecting the temperature of the drink. The bowl is designed to retain champagne's signature carbonation, by reducing the surface area at the opening of the bowl. The flute has largely replaced the champagne coupe or saucer, the shape of which allowed carbonation to dissipate even more rapidly than from a standard wine glass. Its smaller diameter also allows more flutes to be carried on a tray.

Nucleation in a champagne glass helps form the bubbles seen in champagne. Too much nucleation will cause the carbonation to quickly fizzle out. A smoother surface area will produce fewer bubbles in the glass, and more bubble texture in the taster's mouth.

While most commonly used for sparkling wines, flutes are also used for certain beers, especially Belgian lambic and gueuze, which are brewed with wild yeast and often fruited. The tart flavor of these beers, coupled with their carbonation, makes them similar to sparkling white wines, and the champagne flute an ideal choice of glassware.

Food and Wine visit seven
Slurp and gurgle!

The Girls Appear And Things Get Funny!

Food and Wine visit seven
They're back!

Food and Wine visit seven
It's magic!

Food and Wine visit seven
She played the mixer like a violin!

Did you know? - In 1870, Turner Williams of Providence, R.I., invented the first hand egg beater. U.S. Patent 103,811 The first electric mixer was invented by Herbert Johnston in 1908 and sold by the KitchenAid division of the Hobart Manufacturing Company.

Food and Wine visit seven
The assistant!

Food and Wine visit seven
A great morning with super desserts and a lot of levity

Food and Wine visit seven
Oops... The stove was broke!

Food and Wine visit seven
"I can fix anything!" says Jim the producer!

Food and Wine visit seven
m-m-m-m-m

Did you know? - An induction cooker uses a type of induction heating for cooking. It is chiefly distinguished from other common forms of stovetop cooking by the fact that the heat is generated directly in the cooking vessel, as opposed to being generated in the stovetop (as by electrical coils or burning gas) and then transferred to the cooking vessel.

In an induction stovetop, a coil of copper wire--an electromagnet--is placed underneath the cooking pot. An oscillating current is applied to that coil, which produces an oscillating magnetic field. That magnetic field creates heat in the cooking vessel over it, in two different ways. First, it induces a current in the electrically conductive pot, which produces Joule (I2R) heat. Second, it also creates magnetic hysteresis losses in the ferromagnetic pot. The first effect dominates: hysteresis losses typically account for less than ten percent of the total heat generated.

Induction cookers are faster and more energy-efficient than traditional electric cooktops; moreover, they allow instantaneous control of cooking energy, which no energy source other than gas offers. Because induction heats the cooking vessel itself, the possibility of burn injury is significantly reduced compared to other methods: only skin contact with the cooking vessel itself (or, when high heat has been used, the stovetop for a while after the vessel has been removed) can cause harm. There are not the high temperatures of flames or red-hot electric heating elements found in traditional cooking equipment, which generates heat independent of the cooking vessel. Further, induction cookers do not themselves warm the surrounding air, resulting in further energy efficiencies./p>

Food and Wine visit seven
"Oh oh"

Food and Wine visit seven
"You can do it with my eyes closed!"

Food and Wine visit seven
They work together so very well!

Food and Wine visit seven
The team

Food and Wine visit seven
Looking good

Food and Wine visit seven
Full resolution pix are available

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven

Off To The Cooking Demos

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven
Beautiful clouds

Food and Wine visit seven
Look for the ducks

Food and Wine visit seven
Sue slipped into the 12:30 demo!

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven
We met Lacey Lescault while in line! She is a movie star!


She plays the ball park owner!

Food and Wine visit seven
And she paints for Disneyland!

Food and Wine visit seven
We had to sign a release as we might be in the pictures ourselves

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven

Food and Wine visit seven
Heading for home and dancing!