Disney's California Food & Wine Festival

“I eat merely to put food out of my mind.”

Visit #4 For 2010, Beer Tasting

Today we had a Ceviche demonstration from the Santa Monica Fish Company.  La Brea Bakery did some sandwich demonstrations!

Ceviche

Did you know? - One hypothesis suggests that ceviche got its name from the word Cebo, the name given to the corvina fish. However, another hypothesis suggests that the name is a cognate of the Spanish word "escabeche" (marinade), derived from the Arabic term "sikbaj." Yet another hypothesis suggests that its name comes from the Quechua word "siwichi". Ceviche is marinated in a citrus-based mixture, with lemons and limes being the most commonly used. In addition to adding flavor, the citric acid causes the proteins in the seafood to become denatured, which pickles or "cooks" the fish without heat. Traditional style ceviche was marinated around 3 hours. Modern style ceviche created by chef Dario Matsufuji in the 1970s, usually has a very short marinating period. With the appropriate fish, it can marinate in the time it takes to mix the ingredients, serve, and carry the ceviche to the table.

Every Latin American country has given ceviche its own touch of individuality by adding its own particular garnishes. In Panama, ceviche is served with little pastry shells called "canastitas." In Peru, it is served with slices of cold sweet potatoes or corn-on-the-cob. In Ecuador, it is accompanied by corn nuts, or fried green plantains or thinly sliced plantains (plantain chips) called "chifles". It is also served in a large crystal bowl with the guests helping themselves by spearing it with toothpicks

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Sue Located The Spring Garden.... Beautiful

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010
Check for the bee!

Bee
Buzzzzzzzzzzz

Did you know? - Bees play an important role in pollinating flowering plants, and are the major type of pollinator in ecosystems that contain flowering plants. Bees either focus on gathering nectar or on gathering pollen depending on demand, especially in social species. Bees gathering nectar may accomplish pollination, but bees that are deliberately gathering pollen are more efficient pollinators. It is estimated that one third of the human food supply depends on insect pollination, most of which is accomplished by bees, especially the domesticated European honey bee. Contract pollination has overtaken the role of honey production for beekeepers in many countries. Monoculture and the massive decline of many bee species (both wild and domesticated) have increasingly caused honey bee keepers to become migratory so that bees can be concentrated in seasonally-varying high-demand areas of pollination. Osmia ribifloris.

Most bees are fuzzy and carry an electrostatic charge, which aids in the adherence of pollen. Female bees periodically stop foraging and groom themselves to pack the pollen into the scopa, which is on the legs in most bees, and on the ventral abdomen on others, and modified into specialized pollen baskets on the legs of honey bees and their relatives. Many bees are opportunistic foragers, and will gather pollen from a variety of plants, while others are oligolectic, gathering pollen from only one or a few types of plant. A small number of plants produce nutritious floral oils rather than pollen, which are gathered and used by oligolectic bees. One small subgroup of stingless bees, called "vulture bees," is specialized to feed on carrion, and these are the only bees that do not use plant products as food. Pollen and nectar are usually combined together to form a "provision mass", which is often soupy, but can be firm. It is formed into various shapes (typically spheroid), and stored in a small chamber (a "cell"), with the egg deposited on the mass. The cell is typically sealed after the egg is laid, and the adult and larva never interact directly (a system called "mass provisioning").

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Stop By Catal Was A Necessity

Food & Wine #4 May 5 2010

Join us for Visit #5 &Mother's Day!