Disney's California Food & Wine Festival

“I eat merely to put food out of my mind.”

Sweet Sunday #1 And Food And Wine Visit #2

On "Sweet Sundays" Disney brings in famous chefs whose specialty is desserts! We have a great breakfast, plenty of champagne, and then sweets!  This morning we had Chef Ann Czaja Master Chocolatire from Ghirardelli!

Did you know? - A chocolatier is someone who makes confectionery from chocolate. Chocolatiers are distinct from chocolate makers, who create chocolate from cacao beans and other ingredients.

Generally chocolatiers start out as pastry or confectionery chefs, but anyone can become a chocolatier. Through proper schooling, or possibly self education, one could become a chocolatier. Although, proper training may be necessary to obtain an actual job as a chocolatier or to be considered a master chocolatier. A master chocolatier involves perfecting the art of working with chocolate to create not only delicious desserts, but also beautifully and skillfully crafted pieces of art with the chocolate. Generally it takes years of experience and a good background of confections and pastries to master the art of working with chocolate.

She made four desserts:

  1. Flourless mocha tort
  2. Ultimate double chocolate cookies
  3. Ghirardelli dark chocolate truffles
  4. Chocolate lava cake

Who Is Ann Czaja?

Swiss-trained American Maître Chocolatier Ann Czaja worked for Lindt & Sprüngli in Switzerland before returning to the U.S.A. While living and working in Zurich for nearly 14 years, Ann had the opportunity to study pastry and chocolate from the world's foremost authorities. It was a very intense but rewarding experience. Her advice to anyone interested in entering the profession is to treat the chocolate with respect, because it can be extremely temperamental.

Ann

One of the things that Ann is most passionate about is the rich cultural history of chocolate. She thinks it is an amazing natural product and enjoys talking about it almost as much as working with it.

In your opinion, what's the best way to eat chocolate? There is actually an art of tasting fine chocolate. Lindt calls the process "The Five Senses of Chocolate."

Let's Eat!!!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
The tables being set up

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
She is making sure all is ready to go!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Our table is #3, in the distance

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Held inside this year.... Good move

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Time for a pre-breakfast snack!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
All is ready to go!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
We are ready to go!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
The buffet was located in the back

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Chef Ann was very self confident

Sweet Sundat #1 2010

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
An excellent representative of Ghirardelli!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
She told stories and laughed... Great interaction with the kids

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Diego was an excellent assistant

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Almost like they had worked together before

Sweet Sundat #1 2010

Sue Kept An Eye On The Recipes

Did you know? - The earliest known recipes date from approximately 1600 BC and come from an Akkadian tablet from southern Babylonia.

There are ancient Egyptians hieroglyphics depicting the preparation of food.

Many ancient Greek recipes are known. Mithaecus's cookbook was an early one, but most of it has been lost; Athenaeus quotes one short recipe in his Deipnosophistae. Athenaeus mentions many other cookbooks, all of them lost.

Roman recipes are known starting in the 2nd century BCE with Cato the Elder's De Agri Cultura. Many other authors of this period described eastern Mediterranean cooking in Greek and in Latin.

Some Punic recipes are known in Greek and Latin translation.

Much later, in the 4th or 5th century, appears the large collection of recipes conventionally entitled 'Apicius', the only more or less complete surviving cookbook from the classical world. It chronicles the courses served which are usually referred to as Gustatio (appetizer), Primae Mensae (main course) and Secundae Mensae (dessert). The Romans introduced many herbs and spices into western cuisine, Renfrew states that thyme, bay, basil, fennel, rue, mint, parsley and dill were all common in Roman cooking.

Arabic recipes are documented starting in the 10th century; see al-Warraq and al-Baghdadi.

Sweet Sundat #1 2010

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Yup! She doing is right!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
I was going to take a picture sooner but it was too good to wait!

Heading For Home Was Even Fun

The guys were playing portable ovens!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
The kids got to come out and band the pots and pans

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Funny!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Conga line of sorts!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
The stoves are on wheels!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
A true conga line!

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Great percussion

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Talented people!

Time To Had For Catal And The Home

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Our favorite stop

Ducks Are Quite Flexible

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
The parrots are usually performing at this spot

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
Mr. and Mrs Duck were funny

Sweet Sundat #1 2010
"Now what do we do???"

Join Us For Day Four (Day Three Was Camera-less)