San Diego Here We Come 5/7/2014  


There is a light at the end of the tunnel... hopefully its not a freight train!

Huh? San Diego?

How did this come about? Well, ORCC was going to be closed on Wednesday and we were discussing what to do while having our Monday evening Happy Hour at The Boathouse.

We both came up with the same idea at the same time (something that happens a lot) so, voila'... We are off. With a few keystrokes on the computer we had our reservation made and tickets in hand!

Summary

We took the train from Fullerton to San Diego and then took a pedicab a few blocks to "Little Italy" for lunch.  We then headed to the harbor, another eight blocks and caught a boat to tour the south harbor.

Then having an hour remaining, we walked to the train station and waited for the northbound train.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Spending the day with our best friends... Us!

Departure & Traveling To San Diego

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Our train was pulled by an P42DC

Did You Know? - The San Diegan was one of the named passenger trains of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and a "workhorse" of the railroad. Its 126-mile (203-kilometer) route ran from Los Angeles, California south to San Diego. It was assigned train Nos. 70–79 (Nos. 80–83 were added in 1952 when RDCs began operating on the line).

The Los Angeles-San Diego corridor (popularly known as the "Surf Line" — officially, the Fourth District of the Los Angeles Division) was to the Santa Fe as the New York–Philadelphia corridor was to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Daily traffic could reach a density of ten trains (each way) during the summer months. The first San Diegan ran on March 27, 1938 as one set of equipment making two round trips a day.

A second trainset delivered in 1941 made possible four streamlined trains each way. A set of heavyweight equipment made a fifth trip in each direction. During and after the Second World War, furlough business from San Diego's military bases necessitated extra (albeit heavyweight) sections of San Diegans, and racetrack specials during horseracing season at Del Mar added to passenger train miles.

Amtrak continued to operate the San Diegan when it took over operation of the nation's passenger service on May 1, 1971, and it retired the name on June 1, 2000. Today, the route of the San Diegan (the second busiest passenger rail line in the United States) is served by Amtrak's Pacific Surfliner.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Wish the traffic getting here was like this!! We fought the traffic because we
forgot it was a school day morning.... Take a note to self!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
While standing on the platform a freight train
came barreling through at 50 miles per hour

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Sue was smart and stood way back

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Our train is on time and will be here at 8:59 am sharp
We could watch the status on our iPhone... Neet!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Surfliner goes from San Luis Obispo to San Diego

Did You Know? - The Pacific Surfliner is a 350-mile (560 km) Amtrak regional train route serving communities on the coast of Southern California between San Diego and San Luis Obispo. It is part of the Amtrak California series of trains.

The service carried nearly 2.8 million passengers during fiscal year 2011, a 6.6% increase from FY2010. Total revenue during FY2011 was $55,317,127, an increase of 11.7% over FY2010.

The Pacific Surfliner was Amtrak's third-busiest service, and the busiest outside the Northeast Corridor.

The Los Angeles-San Diego portion of the Pacific Surfliner route was once served by the Santa Fe railway's San Diegan passenger trains until Amtrak took over operations. Initially there were three daily trips, but in 1976 the schedule was expanded.

In 1988 the service was extended to Santa Barbara, followed in 1995 with one trip a day going all the way to San Luis Obispo. As the name "San Diegan" no longer reflected the extent of the route, it was re-named the Pacific Surfliner in 2000.

The route is named after the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway's Surf Line.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Here comes good old 566.... (The Train Number) and 461 (Engine Number)

Did You Know? - The EMD F59PHI diesel-electric locomotive is a common locomotive on passenger trains in North America, built originally by General Motors Electro-Motive Division (EMD), now built by the successor company, Electro-Motive Diesel, which is owned by Progress Rail Services, itself a division of Caterpillar.

First built in 1994, the locomotive is a 3,200 hp (2.4 MW) B-B diesel-electric locomotive intended for service on North American mainlines. This locomotive is equipped with a turbocharged EMD 12-710E3,a 12 cylinder, 2 stroke water cooled "Vee" diesel engine (prime mover).

The main (traction) alternator converts mechanical energy from the prime mover into electrical energy that is distributed through a high voltage cabinet and rectifier to direct current traction motors.

Each of the four traction motors is directly geared to a pair of driving wheels. The gear ratio of the traction motors (model D87BTR) to wheel axle determines the maximum operating speed of the locomotive; a standard F59PHI has a gear ratio of 56:21 which provides a top speed of 110 mph (176 km/h).

The F59PHI has a fully enclosed carbody which provides protected walkways for easy access to the engine room and trailing units. This arrangement allows routine maintenance while the locomotive is in service. The noteworthy aspect of this locomotive's exterior is the use of composites to present a streamlined appearance.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We hopped on the Business Class car

Did You Know? - We have a lot of "stops"   along the way

Fullerton
Anaheim
Santa Ana
Irvine
San Juan Capistrano
San Clemente Pier (Limited service)
Oceanside
Carlsbad Village (Limited service)
Carlsbad Poinsettia (Limited service)
Encinitas (Limited service)
Solana Beach
Sorrento Valley (Limited service)
San Diego (Old Town) (Limited service)
San Diego

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
One of the first stops... Angel Stadium

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The champagne is flowing and we are going...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Robin taught Paul how to pose....

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Hard at work pulling our train at 70+ miles per hour!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
It's magic... We are here... Two hours of traveling in luxury

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Great ride... We we directly behind the engine
Our car was the Presidio Park #CTDX 6802

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We arrive about 20 minutes late... That was fine

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Here comes to trolley

Did You Know? - The San Diego Trolley is known for its reliability, safety, and convenience. Often called San Diego's "moving landmark," the Trolley is also a fun way to get around. The Trolley serves historic Old Town, Mission Valley, Fashion Valley, Petco Park, and Qualcomm Stadium, among other popular San Diego destinations.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Postcard circa 1948

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Everything is pretty close together so we got in a couple of miles of walking...
Made for a great day!

Lunch In Little Italy

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014

Did You Know? - Little Italy's throughout the United States have symbolized the tremendous contributions Italians have made to this country. Unfortunately, many of these historically established business districts are disappearing before our eyes.

These Little Italys are either declining due to growth of other adjacent ethnic neighborhoods or are a shadow of their former glory due to the dispersion of Italian families from these districts.

San Diego's Little Italy is different. A stable ethnic business and residential community, since the 1920′s; Little Italy today represents Downtown San Diego's oldest continuous neighborhood business district. At one time, more than 6,000 Italian families lived in Little Italy and toiled to build San Diego into the center of the world's tuna industry.

With the decline of the tuna industry on the West Coast and the destruction of 35% of Little Italy due to the construction of Interstate-5 freeway; Little Italy suffered nearly thirty years of decline.

In the early 1990′s, established property owners and family-run business owners decided to take their fate into their own hands.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Little Italy is an easy walk

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We did something different... We took a pedicab

Did You Know? - The cycle rickshaw is a small-scale local means of transport; it is also known by a variety of other names such as bike taxi, velotaxi, pedicab, bikecab, cyclo, beca, becak, trisikad, or trishaw.

As opposed to rickshaws pulled by a person on foot, cycle rickshaws are human-powered by pedaling. Another type of rickshaw is the auto rickshaw.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Leaving the train station... The 1880's meet the 1990's

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We traveled about ten blocks on India Street

Did You Know? - India Street, the commercial corridor, runs through heart of Little Italy, intermingled with high-density mixed-use buildings and single-family bungalow style historic properties in a highly walkable 48 square block area.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Restaurants and small stores everywhere along the tree lined street

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
A pedicab-eye view of India Street

Did You Know? - Little Italy is a somewhat hilly neighborhood in Downtown San Diego, California that was originally a predominately Italian fishing neighborhood. It has since been gentrified and now Little Italy is a scenic neighborhood composed mostly of Italian restaurants, Italian retail shops, home design stores, art galleries, and residential units.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Paul knew how good this is going to be!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Yeah... We found it again!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We arrived about 11:40 and it was quiet...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The day was brisk so we sat inside...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The establishment is large and they have a stage in back for live music

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The mushroom souffle was delightful and so well presented

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014 Polenta was never so good!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
But alas, all good things must come to and end.... Or we would have exploded

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Head 'em out... Move on.... Rawhide

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
See you again soon

To The Cruise Boat ... About a Mile Away...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Great signs all around Little Italy

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We guess because it is right down town... So we looked twice

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
...and we checked again

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Ah ha.... We found the ocean

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Country Building we visited with the Art Deco Society...

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The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We could spend a day going through these floating museums


Next trip we will spend the afternoon here....

Did You Know? - The Maritime Museum of San Diego, established in 1948, preserves one of the largest collections of historic sea vessels in the United States.

Located in the San Diego Bay, the centerpiece of the museum's collection is the Star of India, an 1863 iron bark. The museum maintains the MacMullen Library and Research Archives aboard the 1898 ferryboat Berkeley. The museum also publishes the quarterly peer-reviewed journal Mains'l Haul: A Journal of Pacific Maritime History.

The Maritime Museum is located on the west side of North Harbor Drive, between the ends of Ash Street and Grape Street, south of San Diego International Airport.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Ferryboat Berkley

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014

Did You Know? - Berkeley was one of several ferryboats of the Southern Pacific Railroad that for sixty years operated on San Francisco Bay between the Oakland Pier and the San Francisco Ferry Building. Built in 1898 by the Union Iron Works of San Francisco, she served after the 1906 earthquake, ferrying refugees across the bay to Oakland.

In the spring of 1958, she was taken out of service for repairs. She never returned to service, as Southern Pacific decided to end all ferry service on July 29, 1958. Berkeley was put up for sale, and was purchased by the Golden Gate Fishing Company to be used as a whaling processing facility.

Before she was put to this use, however, she was sold to ferryboat enthusiast and businessman Bill Conover. Conover had Berkeley docked in Sausalito, a small town on the Bay in Marin County, and converted her into a gift shop called "Trade Fair".

However, Berkeley was not well-maintained in her gift shop incarnation and 12 years of serious deterioration took a toll.

In 1973, she was sold to the Maritime Museum of San Diego. She was towed out of San Francisco Bay by tug on May 31, 1973 arriving 3 days later in San Diego where she was subsequently restored. She currently serves as the main "building" of the Maritime Museum of San Diego.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Dolphin (AGSS-555)

Did You Know? - USS Dolphin (AGSS-555) was the United States Navy's last operational diesel-electric, deep-diving, research and development submarine.

Her keel was laid down on 9 November 1962 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 8 June 1968 sponsored by Mrs. Daniel K. Inouye (the wife of the senator for Hawaii), and commissioned on 17 August 1968 with Lieutenant Commander J.R. McDonnell in command.

Despite her recent repair and upgrade, Dolphin was decommissioned on 15 January 2007 and was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on the same date.


Big collection of ships

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
It's a duck... No, it's a seal

Seeing The Harbor

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
A short walk to the cruise boat and off we go!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
We only had time for the southern part of the harbor (Green/Blue route)

Did You Know? - San Diego Bay is a natural harbor and deepwater port located in San Diego County, California near the US-Mexico border.

The bay, which is 12 miles (19 km) long and 1 to 3 miles (1.6 to 4.8 km) wide, is the third largest of the three large, protected natural bays on California's entire 840 miles (1,350 km) long coastline after San Francisco Bay and Humboldt Bay.

The highly urbanized land adjacent to the bay includes the city of San Diego (eighth largest city in the United States) and four other cities, including National City, Chula Vista, Imperial Beach and Coronado.

Considered to be one of the best natural harbors on the west coast of North America it was colonized by Spain beginning in 1769.

Later it served as base headquarters of major ships of the United States Navy in the Pacific until just before the United States entered World War II, when the newly organized United States Pacific Fleet primary base was transferred to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

However, San Diego Bay remains as a home port of major assets, including several aircraft carriers, of the United States Pacific Fleet, and as a result of base closures beginning in the 1980s, facilities in San Diego Bay are the only remaining major naval base facilities still in operation in the entire State of California.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Click for full-sized 3000px x 900px image
of the Coronado Bridge

Did You Know? - The 11,179-foot-long (3,407 m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. The span reaches a maximum height of 200 feet (61m), allowing the U.S. Navy ships which operate out of the nearby Naval Station San Diego to pass underneath it.

The five-lane bridge featured the longest box girder in the world until it was surpassed by a bridge in Chongqing, China in 2008. The bridge does not form a direct path to Coronado, but rather has a curve. This was done so it would be high enough for all U.S. Navy ships to pass underneath but not too steep for vehicles to ascend and descend.

Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967, and opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Here we go.... Departing Gate #3

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Our ship is coming in!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Whoa big boy... Remember to stop

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Ten minutes later and we are on our way out...
Does anybody see a martini glass in this picture???

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The buildings looked great all spruced up

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The USS Midway was right next door

Did You Know? - The USS Midway Museum is an unforgettable adventure for the entire family. Guests can spend the day exploring more than 60 exhibits with a collection of 29 restored aircraft. The self-guided audio tour, narrated by Midway sailors, brings the carrier's history to life. Those who dare can "take to the sky" aboard one of two flight simulators.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Harbor Building oversees the activities in and around the area

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
She is a grand looking ship

Did You Know? - USS Midway (CVB/CVA/CV-41) was an aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, the lead ship of its class. Commissioned a week after the end of World War II, the Midway was the largest ship in the world until 1955, as well as the first U.S. warship too big to transit the Panama Canal.

A revolutionary hull design, based on the planned Montana-class battleship, gave her better maneuverability than previous carriers.

She served for an unprecedented 47 years, saw action in the Vietnam War, and was the Persian Gulf flagship in 1991's Operation Desert Storm. Decommissioned in 1992, she is now a museum ship at the USS Midway Museum, in San Diego, California,

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The bridge is 200 feet tall to enable our naval ships to go underneath....
Worked fine except for the newest aircraft carriers

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
These carriers have to park on the north side of the bridge

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Ships in for repairs/retrofits... Checkout the "stealth shapes"
The plastic wrap is used to keep spraying of chemicals out of the air

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The shapes reflect radar waves making the ship look like a dingy...
Heck of a dingy

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Navy Seals were dropping out of the choppers...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Look carefully and you can see them bobbing in the water.... Staying trained

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Sue preferred inside on this windy and cool day... Smart lady!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USNS Mercy always ready when needed

Did You Know? - She was named for the virtue of compassion. In accordance with the Geneva Conventions, USNS Mercy and her crew do not carry any offensive weapons, though defensive weapons are available. Firing on the Mercy would be considered a war crime.

Mercy was built as an oil tanker, SS Worth, by National Steel and Shipbuilding Company, San Diego, in 1976. Starting in July 1984, she was renamed and converted to a hospital ship by the same company. Launched on 20 July 1985, USNS Mercy was commissioned on 8 November 1986. She has a raised forecastle, a transom stern, a bulbous bow, an extended deckhouse with a forward bridge, and a helicopter-landing deck with a flight control facility. The Mercy class hospital ships are the third largest ships in the U.S. Navy Fleet by length, surpassed only by the nuclear-powered Ford-class and Nimitz-class supercarriers.

USNS Mercy, homeported in San Diego, is normally in reduced operating status. Her crew remains a part of the staff of Naval Medical Center San Diego until ordered to sea, at which time they have five days to fully activate the ship to a NATO Role III Medical Treatment Facility, the highest only to shore based fixed facilities outside of the theater of operations.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Trimarans... Top speed over 50 mph!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Cruiser awaits orders

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Essex (LHD-2)

Did You Know? - USS Essex (LHD-2) is a United States Navy Wasp-class amphibious assault ship built at what is now Huntington Ingalls Industries in Pascagoula, Mississippi, and commissioned on 17 October 1992 while moored at North Island NAS beside the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). It is the fifth ship named for Essex County, Massachusetts. Dick Cheney, then the Secretary of Defense in the first Bush Administration, spoke at the commissioning ceremony. Essex served as the command ship for Expeditionary Strike Group Seven until replaced by the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) on 23 April 2012.

The Essex entered a 18-month maintenance and upgrade at Naval Station San Diego on September 18, 2012.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Armed to the teeth

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) is a Ticonderoga-class
guided-missile cruiser in service in the United States Navy.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Floating dry-dock and a "hotel" used to house the crew while the ship is being
repaired... Nice to live close to your work

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Destroyers lined up and ready to go

Did You Know? - In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast and maneuverable yet long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller, powerful, short-range attackers. The first ship named and classified as a destroyer was the Spanish warship Destructor (1886), designed by Fernando Villaamil and constructed in England in the shipyard of James and George Thomson of Clydebank, near the Yarrow shipyards.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Boxer (LHD-4)

Did You Know? - The USS Boxer (LHD-4) is a Wasp-class amphibious assault ship of the United States Navy. She is the sixth U.S. Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for the original HMS Boxer, which had been captured from the British during the War of 1812.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Bataan (LHD-5)

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
When at sea she is a powerful force

Did You Know? - USS Bataan (LHD-5) is a Wasp-class amphibious assault ship commissioned in 1997. It is named to honor the defense of the Bataan Peninsula on the western side of Manila Bay in the Philippines during the early days of US involvement in World War II.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
One of several littoral combat ship (LCS)

Did You Know? - The littoral combat ship (LCS) is a class of relatively small surface vessels intended for operations in the littoral zone (close to shore) by the United States Navy. It was "envisioned to be a networked, agile, stealthy surface combatant capable of defeating anti-access and asymmetric threats in the littorals

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USS Independence (LCS-2)

Did You Know? - USS Independence (LCS-2) is the lead ship of the Independence-class littoral combat ship. She is the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the concept of independence. The design was produced by the General Dynamics consortium for the Navy's LCS program, and competes with the Lockheed Martin-designed Freedom variant.

Independence, delivered to the Navy at the end of 2009, is a high-speed, small-crew corvette (although the U.S. Navy does not use the term) intended for operation in the littoral zone.

It can swap out various systems to take on various missions, including finding and destroying mines, hunting submarines in and near shallow water, and fighting small boats (it is not intended to fight warships).

The ship is a trimaran design with a wide beam above the waterline that supports a larger flight deck than those of the Navy's much larger destroyers and cruisers, as well as a large hangar and a similarly large mission bay below.

The trimaran hull also exhibits low hydrodynamic drag, allowing efficient operation on two diesel-powered water jets at speeds up to 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph), and high-speed operation on two gas turbine-powered water jets at a sustainable 44 knots (81 km/h; 51 mph) and even faster for short periods.


The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR-300)   It is called a ROLO  (Roll ON/Roll Off)

Did You Know? - USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR-300), the lead ship of her class of vehicle cargo ships for Army vehicle prepositioning, is the only naval ship of the United States to be named for Bob Hope, the entertainer. Very few ships of the United States Navy have been named for a person who was alive at the time of the christening.

The contract to build her was awarded to Avondale Industries on 2 September 1993 and her keel was laid down on 29 May 1995. She was launched on 27 March 1997, and delivered on 18 November 1998.

A non-combatant roll-on/roll-off (RORO) vessel crewed by civilian mariners under the Navy's Military Sealift Command, Bob Hope and other ships of the class are used to preposition tanks, trucks and other wheeled vehicles and supplies needed to support an army heavy brigade.

Bob Hope has already seen service delivering supplies and equipment to the Balkans and Iraq.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Meanwhile we had a stowaway... Do you see him???

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Returning home with a beautiful view of the San Diego skyline

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The Midway awaits us...

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
OK... One more try... Do you see the martini glass???

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
After 60+ years, still a beautiful ship

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Returning to dock... A great hour on the water

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Home safe from the sea...

Going Home

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Yes... We looked several times

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Apartments right on the water///

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Interesting treatment of the ties...
Probably some type of test underway

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
When stations had class....

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
As it was in 1920

Did You Know? - Union Station in San Diego, California, much more commonly known as the Santa Fe Depot, is a train station built by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway to replace the small Victorian-style structure erected in 1887 for the California Southern Railroad Company. The Spanish Colonial Revival style station is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its architecture, particularly the signature twin domes, is often echoed in the design of modern buildings in Downtown San Diego. A wing now houses the downtown branch of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego.

The Santa Fe Depot (as it was originally designated) officially opened on March 8, 1915, to accommodate visitors to the Panama-California Exposition.[5] The depot was completed during a particularly optimistic period in the City's development, and represents the battle waged by the City of San Diego to become the West Coast terminus of the Santa Fe Railway system's transcontinental railroad, a fight that was ultimately lost to the City of Los Angeles.

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Our train awaits us... Just waiting for the announcement to board

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Computers are amazing... We printed out our tickets on-line at home

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
In a cloud of smoke... Off we go! Heading north!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Zipping through people's back yards at 50 mph

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
"Oh Dear... We seem to be missing something! Wine!"

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The freeways were busy and slow but not us.... We be flyin'
We sat with two ladies from the local area who were on their way to Peru!

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The sun is getting lower in the sky

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Watching the world go by....

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
The guys really liked Paul's "Train Shirt"

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Bet you didn't notice the first time

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014
Sue dresses Paul for the event....

The train to San Diego May 7th 2014

Background Music: Orange Blossom Special