Jeanette Lind

Daughters are like flowers, they fill the world with beauty, and sometimes attract pests.  ~Author Unknown

Jeanette Goes To The Elks!

It's dancing with the Stars night... and we have stars!

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
After the ballroom is done, the line dancers begin!

Did You Know? - A line dance is choreographed dance with a repeated sequence of steps in which a group of people dance in one or more lines or rows without regard for the gender of the individuals, all facing the same direction, and executing the steps at the same time. Line dancers are not in physical contact with each other. Older "line dances" have lines in which the dancers face each other, or the "line" is a circle, or all dancers in the "line" follow a leader around the dance floor; while holding the hand of the dancers beside them.

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
They are moving....

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
"Yes, now this is dancing!"

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Electric Slide

Did You Know? - In a four-wall dance, the direction faced at the end of the sequence is 90 degrees to the right or left from the direction in which they faced at the beginning. As a result, the dancers face each of the four walls in turn at the end of four consecutive repetitions of the sequence, before returning to the original wall. The hustle line dance is an example of a four-wall dance because in the final figure they turn 90 degrees to the left to face a new wall.

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
How low can you go???

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Moving

Did You Know? - Line dancing is practiced and learned in country-western dance bars, social clubs, dance clubs and ballrooms worldwide. It avoids the problem of imbalance of male/female partners that plagues ballroom/swing/salsa dancing clubs. It is sometimes combined on dance programs with other forms of country-western dance, such as two-step, and western promenade dances, as well as western-style variants of the waltz, polka and swing.

The Macarena and the Chicken Dance, the later of which is danced in a circle, are other examples of line dance.

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
All parts are going....

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Donna and Jeanette lead the way

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Getting a little risque' here aren't we???

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
"Hey, look at Jeanette!!"

Paul Hits The Floor

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
"OK guys and girls... do it this way!!"

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
The boys watch on...

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
No smile... He is concentrating on his feet

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
"So Donna.... Am I doing OK???"

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Do the Hokey Pokey

Did You Know? - The Hokey Cokey, Hokey Pokey, Hokey Tokey, or Cokey Cokey is a participation dance with a distinctive accompanying tune and lyric structure. It is well known in English-speaking countries. It is of unclear origin, with two main traditions having evolved in different parts of the world.

According to one account,[1] in 1940, during the Blitz in London, a Canadian officer suggested to Al Tabor, a British bandleader of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s that he write a party song with actions similar to "Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree". The inspiration for the song's title, "The Hokey Pokey", that resulted, came from an ice cream vendor whom Al had heard as a boy, calling out "Hokey pokey penny a lump. Have a lick make you jump". He changed the name to "The Hokey Cokey" at the suggestion of the officer who said that 'hokey cokey', in Canada, meant 'crazy' and would sound better. A well known lyricist/songwriter/music publisher of the time, Jimmy Kennedy, reneged on a financial agreement to promote and publish it, and finally Al settled out of court, giving up all rights to the number

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009

Jeanette Goes To The Elks June 2009
Paul & Donna finish off the dance in style!!!