Christmas 2009 Dance At Old Rance

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 12/20/2009

Time for friends to gather and celebrate the season.  We are treated to an evening of saxophone entertainment.

Did you know? - The saxophone (also referred to simply as sax) is a conical-bored transposing musical instrument considered a member of the woodwind family. Saxophones are usually made of brass and are played with a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet. The saxophone was invented by Adolphe Sax in 1841.

He wanted to create an instrument that would both be the loudest of the woodwinds and the most versatile of the brass, and would fill the then vacant middle ground between the two sections. He patented the sax in 1846 in two groups of seven instruments each. Each series consisted of instruments of various sizes in alternating transposition. The series pitched in B-flat and E-flat, designed for military bands, has proved extremely popular and most saxophones encountered today are from this series. A few saxophones remain from the less popular orchestral series pitched in C and F

 

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
The club was decorated to the Nine's

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Guests make their way in through the grand entrance

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
James opens their Christmas card

Did you know? - The first commercial Christmas cards were commissioned by Sir Henry Cole in London in 1843 and featured an illustration by John Callcott Horsley. The picture, of a family with a small child drinking wine together, proved controversial, but the idea was shrewd: Cole had helped introduce the Penny Post three years earlier. Two batches totaling 2,050 cards were printed and sold that year for a shilling each.

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Beware it plays music

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
OK, it's not a boxer but the thought is the same!

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Card exchange time

Bunnaford Fulfills A Promise... A Dance!

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Paul gets first dibbies

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
All of a sudden a tap on my should and James steals her attention

Did you know? - Cutting in is a process, in dancing, by which a person interrupts two dance partners and claims the partner of one. As traditionally portrayed in Hollywood films, men are more likely to cut in than women. The proper protocol:

Step 1 Enter the dance floor and approach the couple.
Step 2 Face the person with whom you wish to dance, standing slightly to the couple's side.
Step 3 Tap the person you wish to replace once, lightly, on the outside of the left shoulder.
Step 4 Wait for the dancers to part.
Step 5 Look at your partner, not the person you have replaced.
Step 6 Offer one hand.
Step 7 Step into dancing position with your partner when your hand is taken.
Step 8 Begin dancing.
Step 9 Choose a topic other than the previous dancing partner if you talk.

 

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
And it happens again... This time it is Vince!

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
She goes back to old trusty Paul

Time To Dine

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
The tableside service begins

Did you know? - Waiting staff, wait staff, or waitstaff are those who work at a restaurant or a bar attending customers — supplying them with food and drink as requested. Traditionally, a male waiting tables is called a "waiter" and a female a "waitress." Some people prefer to use gender-neutral language, using waiter indiscriminately for males and females, server,, waitperson,, or waitron, an Americanism coined in the 1980s.

 

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Enjoying dinner and conversation

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Flaming someting

Did you know? - Tableside dining has made a comeback. This old tradition, which has its roots in European-style fine dining, is primarily associated with classic dishes like Caesar salad and carved roast beef, and flaming desserts like Bananas Foster or crêpes Suzette. Nowadays, many restaurants are adding a new twist by offering dishes not typically associated with tableside service, such as small plates, a hearty stew or even the use of a cart for things other than desserts or cheese. Tableside adds drama to the meal, and in a business setting, it can be the ideal icebreaker. The experience also encourages conversation, as many dishes are meant for two or can be shared amongst the table.

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Sue gets her entree

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
He did something twice

The Dance Floor Was Busy This Evening

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Ernie and John


Ernie and James

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009


Meanwhile back at the

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
It's giggle time

Did you know? - Giggling is a high-pitched, bubbly way of laughing. It is usually suppressed, resulting in short bursts of laughter. A giggle is often considered a very feminine laugh. Giggling is normally affiliated with laughing gas a dentist would administer. Giggling is often associated with small children.

 

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Ernie and Paul trip the light fantastic

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Vicky Met Some Old Friends

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009

Old Ranch Christmas Dinner Dance 2009
Sue checks out the wine case